“The World is Either Algorithmic or Mostly Random” awarded a 3rd Place Prize in this year’s FQXi contest

Based on the combined ratings of the contest community and the panel of expert reviewers appointed by the FXQi, which included the members of the institute, I was awarded a 3rd Place Prize for my work The World is Either Algorithmic or Mostly Random in this year’s FQXi contest on the topic Is Reality Digital or Analog? sponsored by the Foundational Questions Institute. The winners were announced at this year’s World Science Festival in New York City.

My work can be summarized in one line as an explanation of the complexification process of the world, the process whereby we have evolved from a more primitive (random) state to the current organized state of the universe.

The essay is a summary of the philosophical branch of my current scientific research on finite algorithmic information theory. This philosophical branch is concerned with the exploration of the possible connections between algorithmic complexity and the physical world (or what happens in it). I propose the notion that the universe is likely digital, not as a claim about what the universe is ultimately made of but rather about the way it unfolds. Central to the argument are concepts of symmetry breaking and algorithmic probability, which are used as tools to compare the way patterns are distributed in our world to the way patterns are distributed in a simulated digital one. These concepts provide a framework for a discussion of the informational nature of reality. I argue that if the universe were analog, then the world would likely look more random, making it largely incomprehensible. The digital model has, however, an inherent beauty in its imposition of an upper limit and in the convergence in computational power to a maximal level of sophistication. Even if deterministic, that the world is digital doesn’t necessarily mean that the world is trivial or predictable, but rather that it is built up from operations that at the lowest scale are simple but that at a higher scale look complex and even random–though in appearance only.

How have we come from the early state of the universe (left) to the structures we find today (right)?

The arguments supporting my views are partially based on the findings of my research, epitomized by our most recent paper Numerical Evaluation of Algorithmic Complexity for Short Strings: A Glance into the Innermost Structure of Randomness available in ArXiv in which my co-author and I describe a method that combines several theoretical and experimental results to numerically approximate the algorithmic (Kolmogorov-Chaitin) complexity of bitstrings by using the concept of algorithmic probability, which is connected to algorithmic complexity by way of the (Levin-Chaitin) coding theorem.

An extended (and detailed) version of The World is Either Algorithmic or Mostly Random is forthcoming and will be eventually posted.

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