Archive for March, 2013

New volume: A Computable Universe

Posted in General on March 23rd, 2013 by Hector Zenil – Be the first to comment

With a foreword by Sir Roger Penrose, my new volume A Computable Universe has been published by World Scientific and the Imperial College Press after my bestseller Randomness Through Computation in 2011. A Computable Universe: Understanding and Exploring Nature as Computation, introduces the views of the pioneers in the computable universe view of the world and some of its strongest opponents (including Penrose himself).

 

bookcover

In the context of the Alan Turing Year, the book discusses the foundations of computation in relation to nature.

  • What is computation?
  • How does nature compute?

They discuss computation in the world from a variety of perspectives, ranging from foundational concepts to pragmatic models to ontological conceptions and philosophical implications.

The volume provides a state-of-the-art collection of technical papers and non-technical essays, representing a field that assumes information and computation to be key in understanding and explaining the basic structure underpinning physical reality. It also includes a new edition, prepared by Adrian German from Indiana University Bloomington and myself, of Konrad Zuse’s “Calculating Space” (the MIT translation) fully retyped in shiny LaTeX with a few corrections and improvements to figures. A free copy of which is available here (trivia: Zuse’s name was used in the Tron: Legacy film (2010) certainly inspired by his mind blowing ideas on a digital universe).

The book also includes a panel discussion transcription on the volume topic, featuring worldwide experts including a Nobel prize in quantum mechanics, physics, cognition, computation and algorithmic complexity. In this section I asked authors (and other authors asked as well) what I thought an informed reader would ask them (including myself), sometimes leading to quite heated exchanges.

The volume is dedicated to the memory of Alan M. Turing — the inventor of universal computation, on the 100th anniversary of his birth, and is part of the Turing Centenary celebrations.

Free sample chapter(s)
Foreword (533 KB)
Chapter 1: Introduction the Computable Universe (476 KB) by myself.
Table of Contents:

    • Foreword (R Penrose)
    • Preface
    • Acknowledgements
    • Introducing the Computable Universe (H Zenil)
  • Historical, Philosophical & Foundational Aspects of Computation:
    • Origins of Digital Computing: Alan Turing, Charles Babbage, & Ada Lovelace (D Swade)
    • Generating, Solving and the Mathematics of Homo Sapiens. E Post’s Views on Computation (L De Mol)
    • Machines (R Turner)
    • Effectiveness (N Dershowitz & E Falkovich)
    • Axioms for Computability: Do They Allow a Proof of Church’s Thesis? (W Sieg)
    • The Mathematician’s Bias — and the Return toEmbodied Computation (S B Cooper)
    • Intuitionistic Mathematics and Realizability in the Physical World (A Bauer)
    • What is Computation? Actor Model versus Turing’s Model (C Hewitt)
  • Computation in Nature & the Real World:
    • Reaction Systems: A Natural Computing Approach to the Functioning of Living Cells (A Ehrenfeucht, J Kleijn, M Koutny & G Rozenberg)
    • Bacteria, Turing Machines and Hyperbolic Cellular Automata (M Margenstern)
    • Computation and Communication in Unorganized Systems (C Teuscher)
    • The Many Forms of Amorphous Computational Systems (J Wiedermann)
    • Computing on Rings (G J Martínez, A Adamatzky & H V McIntosh)
    • Life as Evolving Software (G J Chaitin)
    • Computability and Algorithmic Complexity in Economics (K V Velupillai & S Zambelli)
    • Blueprint for a Hypercomputer (F A Doria)
  • Computation & Physics & the Physics of Computation:
    • Information-Theoretic Teleodynamics in Natural and Artificial Systems (A F Beavers & C D Harrison)
    • Discrete Theoretical Processes (DTP) (E Fredkin)
    • The Fastest Way of Computing All Universes (J Schmidhuber)
    • The Subjective Computable Universe (M Hutter)
    • What Is Ultimately Possible in Physics? (S Wolfram)
    • Universality, Turing Incompleteness and Observers (K Sutner)
    • Algorithmic Causal Sets for a Computational Spacetime (T Bolognesi)
    • The Computable Universe Hypothesis (M P Szudzik)
    • The Universe is Lawless or “Pantôn chrêmatôn metron anthrôpon einai” (C S Calude, F W Meyerstein & A Salomaa)
    • Is Feasibility in Physics Limited by Fantasy Alone? (C S Calude & K Svozil)
  • The Quantum, Computation & Information:
    • What is Computation? (How) Does Nature Compute? (D Deutsch)
    • The Universe as Quantum Computer (S Lloyd)
    • Quantum Speedup and Temporal Inequalities for Sequential Actions (M ?ukowski)
    • The Contextual Computer (A Cabello)
    • A Gödel-Turing Perspective on Quantum States Indistinguishable from Inside (T Breuer)
    • When Humans Do Compute Quantum (P Zizzi)
  • Open Discussion Section:
    • Open Discussion on A Computable Universe (A Bauer, T Bolognesi, A Cabello, C S Calude, L De Mol, F Doria, E Fredkin, C Hewitt, M Hutter, M Margenstern, K Svozil, M Szudzik, C Teuscher, S Wolfram & H Zenil)
  • Live Panel Discussion (transcription):
    • What is Computation? (How) Does Nature Compute? (C S Calude, G J Chaitin, E Fredkin, A J Leggett, R de Ruyter, T Toffoli & S Wolfram)
  • Zuse’s Calculating Space:
    • Calculating Space (Rechnender Raum(K Zuse)
    • Afterword to Konrad Zuse’s Calculating Space (A German & H Zenil)

Available at Amazon and your favorite online retailers.

My new book: Irreducibility and Computational Equivalence

Posted in General on March 23rd, 2013 by Hector Zenil – Be the first to comment

Irreducibility and Computational Equivalence is a collection of contributions by outstanding authors in celebration of Stephen Wolfram’s A New Kind of Science after 10 years of its publication. Published by Springer Verlag it is already available both Paperback and Hardcover, as well as an eBook and CDF (computable document).

Here is a free preview and the book website from Springer.

ZenilWolframBook It is clear that computation is playing an increasingly prominent role in the development of mathematics, as well as in the natural and social sciences. The work of Stephen Wolfram over the last several decades has been a salient part in this phenomenon helping founding the field of Complex Systems, with many of his constructs and ideas incorporated in his book A New Kind of Science (ANKS) becoming part of the scientific discourse and general academic knowledge–from the now established Elementary Cellular Automata to the unconventional concept of mining the Computational Universe, from today’s widespread Wolfram’s Behavioural Classification to his principles of Irreducibility and Computational Equivalence.

I found this volume fascinating in its efforts to flesh out the computational implications for biology more generally.
– Dr. Mark Changizi

I believe that this book will be an inspiration for future work in interdisciplinary research at the intersection of computer science, natural and social sciences.
– Prof. Ivan Zelinka

The volume, with a Foreword by Gregory Chaitin and an Afterword by Cris Calude, covers these and other topics related to or motivated by Wolfram’s seminal ideas, reporting on research undertaken in the decade following the publication of Wolfram’s NKS book. Featuring 39 authors, its 23 contributions are organized into seven parts.

It is now available from Amazon and any large online bookstore, and directly from Springer itself.

Table of Contents:

Foreword
Gregory Chaitin

Part I Mechanisms in Programs and Nature

1. Hyperbolic Cellular Automata
Maurice Margenstern
2. A Lyapunov View on the Stability of Cellular Automata
Jan M. Baetens & Bernard De Baets
3. On the Necessity of Complexity
Joost J. Joosten
4. Computational Technosphere and Cellular Engineering
Mark Burgin

Part II The World of Numbers & Simple Programs

5. Cellular Automata: Models of the Physical World
Herbert W. Franke
6. Symmetry and Complexity of Cellular Automata: Towards an Analytical Theory of Dynamical System
Klaus Mainzer
7. A New Kind of Science: Ten Years Later
David H. Bailey

Part III Everyday Systems

8. A New Kind of Finance
Philip Z. Maymin
9. The Relevance and Importance of Computation Universality in Economics
Kumaraswamy Velupillai
10. Exploring the Sources of and Nature of Computational Irreducibility
Brian Beckage, Stuart Kauffman, Louis Gross, Asim Zia, Gabor Vattay and Chris Koliba

Part IV Fundamental Physics

11. The Principle of a Finite Density of Information
Gilles Dowek and Pablo Arrighi
12. Artificial Cosmogenesis: A New Kind of Cosmology
Clément Vidal
13. Do Particles Evolve?
Tommaso Bolognesi

Part V The Behavior of Systems & the Notion of Computation

14. An Incompleteness Theorem for the Natural World
Rudy Rucker
15. Pervasiveness of Universalities of Cellular Automata: Fascinating Life-like Behaviours
Emmanuel Sapin
16. Wolfram’s Classification and Computation in Cellular Automata Classes III and IV
Genaro J. Martinez, Juan Carlos Seck Tuoh Mora and Hector Zenil

Part VI Irreducibility & Computational Equivalence

17. Exploring the Computational Limits of Haugeland’s Game as a Two-Dimensional Cellular Automaton
Drew Reisinger, Taylor Martin, Mason Blankenship, Christopher Harrison, Jesse Squires and Anthony Beavers
18. Irreducibility and Computational Equivalence
Hervé Zwrin and Jean-Paul Delahaye
19. Computational Equivalence and Classical Recursion Theory
Klaus Sutner

Part VII Deliberations and Philosophical Implications

20. Wolfram and the Computing Nature
Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic
21. A New Kind of Philosophy. Manifesto for a Digital Ontology
Jacopo Tagliabue
22. Free Will For Us, not For Robots
Selmer Bringsjord

Afterword
Cristian Calude

Available from Amazon and any large online bookstore, and directly from Springer itself.

Life as Thermodynamic Evidence of Algorithmic Structure in Natural Environments

Posted in General on March 23rd, 2013 by Hector Zenil – Be the first to comment

In evolutionary biology, attention to the relationship between stochastic organisms and their stochastic environments has leaned towards the adaptability and learning capabilities of the organisms rather than toward the properties of the environment. This article is devoted to the algorithmic aspects of the environment and its interaction with living organisms. We ask whether one may use the fact of the existence of life to establish how far nature is removed from algorithmic randomness. The paper uses a novel approach to behavioral evolutionary questions, using tools drawn from information theory, algorithmic complexity and the thermodynamics of computation to support an intuitive assumption about the near optimal structure of a physical environment that would prove conducive to the evolution and survival of organisms, and sketches the potential of these tools, at present alien to biology, that could be used in the future to address different and deeper questions. We contribute to the discussion of the algorithmic structure of natural environments and provide statistical and computational arguments for the intuitive claim that living systems would not be able to survive in completely unpredictable environments, even if adaptable and equipped with storage and learning capabilities by natural selection (brain memory or DNA).

This new paper has recently been published online and is freely available from MDPI here. The statistics show 355 readers in only 3 months.

Zenil, H.; Gershenson, C.; Marshall, J.A.R.; Rosenblueth, D.A. Life as Thermodynamic Evidence of Algorithmic Structure in Natural Environments. Entropy 2012, 14, 2173-2191.

Announcing the Online Algorithmic Complexity Calculator

Posted in Algorithmic information theory, Complexity, General on March 23rd, 2013 by Hector Zenil – Be the first to comment

We have made available a basic beta version of an Online Algorithmic Complexity Calculator implementing the methods we have developed in recent papers at the Algorithmic Nature lab.

The OACC provides a comprehensive framework of universal mathematical measures of algorithmic complexity for researchers and professionals. It retrieves objective numerical measures of randomness for potential applications in a very wide range of disciplines, from bioinformatics to psychometrics, from linguistics to economics.

It is based on several years of research devoted to new methods for evaluating the information content and algorithmic complexity. The description of the Coding Theorem method to deal with short strings is described in this paper. It currently retrieves numerical approximations to Kolmogorv complexity and Levin’s universal distribution (or Solomonoff algorithmic probability) for binary strings of short length, for which lossless compression algorithms fail as a method for approximation to program-size complexity, hence providing a complementary and useful alternative to compression algorithms. More algorithmic information measures, more data and more techniques will be incorporated gradually in the future, covering a wider range of objects such as longer binary strings, non-binary strings and n-dimensional objects (such as images).

It also includes a Short String Complexity Explorer (it may take some time to run if you open the link) tool developed in Mathematica, it runs oinline with a free player. It provides a comparison of the estimated Kolmogorov complexity (K), the algorithmic probability (m), Shannon’s Entropy (E) and compressibility (using Deflate) of a string. It also provides an indication of the relative complexity among all other strings for which K has been approximated and its distribution rank.